Translanguaging for Emerging Experts

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In my last post (“Translanguaging for Dummies”), I talked about Cummins’ (2005) recommendation of using cognates as a translanguaging strategy. I love that idea, because it is a very simple way to acknowledge that languages do not need to be kept separate. Today, I will discuss translanguaging through translation. Continue reading

“Translanguaging for Dummies”

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After all of my discussion about translanguaging in the last three posts (Translanguaging in the L2 Classroom, Translanguaging: Establishing Some Foundations, and Overcoming the Monolingual Bias), you may be wondering, “So how do we actually use it?” In this post and the next two, I will examine some specific strategies offered by various scholars, considering ways in which they could be extended and applied in different classroom contexts. Continue reading

Overcoming the Monolingual Bias

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In my last post (Translanguaging: Establishing Some Foundations), I highlighted the monolingual bias in language education and discussed the importance of being strategic in employing translanguaging strategies, including through having clear guidelines for when it is appropriate. However, I feel that I did not adequately address the question of why it is important to challenge the monolingual principle in language education. Continue reading

Translanguaging: Establishing Some Foundations

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In my last post (Translanguaging in the L2 Classroom), I discussed research that suggests that translanguaging, or allowing learners’ languages to be used together during the process of acquisition, has potential as a teaching strategy. In this post, I address some common attitudes about translanguaging and suggest some things to consider before employing it in the classroom.

You may have reservations about translanguaging Continue reading